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  • Sylvia Moore 5:01 pm on August 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: activism, American Taliban, , islamic radicalism, , , , , netroots, , radical, religion, , ,   

    Markos Moulitsas Speaking in LA September 22nd 

    From The L.A. Progressive:

    Markos Moulitsas Speaking in LA September 22nd

    Daily Kos Founder Discussing New Book, “American Taliban”

    Markos Moulitsas, a driving force in new media and founder of The Daily Kos, will speak and sign his ground-breaking book at a free reading to support the LA Media Reform Group’s annual media summit to be held February 26, 2011.

    The Daily Kos is among the largest and most influential progressive online political communities. Known for his biting wit, unwavering gaze, and willingness to take on all sides of the political spectrum, Moulitsas is a regular on cable news shows such as Meet the Press, Countdown with Keith Olbermann, and Real Time with Bill Maher and is a columnist for The Hill. He was recently banned from MSNBC for a Twitter fight with right-wing host Joe Scarborugh.

    In his just released American Taliban: How War, Sex, Sin, and Power Bind Jihadists and the Radical Right, Markos Moulitas—known to millions as simply “Kos”—Moulistas argues that America’s radical right shares the same traits as our main international enemy—Islamic radicalism. Both extremist groups favor theocracy, curtail civil rights, repress women and revile homosexuality, subvert science and education, and revere force over diplomacy.

    “In this day and age of gut-reacting, gutter-fighting world of hyperbole and rhetoric, it is time for critical thinkers to unite and support others who commit so much time to reporting facts.” –Tapia Martinez – LA Media Reform Group; Co-Founder.

    “It isn’t possible to understand American politics now without understanding the worldview and arguments of Markos Moulitsas. If you still believe the Beltway caricature of the squishy, compromising, conciliatory American left, American Taliban should disabuse you of that notion.” — Rachel Maddow

    Kos’s earlier publications include the critically acclaimed Crashing the Gate: Netroots, Grassroots, and the Rise of People-Powered Politics (2006) and Taking on the System: Rules for Radical Change in a Digital Era (2008).

    Details:

    Wednesday, September 22, 7 p.m.
    Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Westminster Chapel
    3300 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles

    *Admission is free with RSVP in advance to lamrg@commoncause.org
    *Attendees are encouraged to purchase the author’s book at the event

    The LA Media Reform group is sponsoring this event in collaboration with the LA Progressive and Alliance Hollywood.
    ________________

    The Los Angeles Media Reform Group focuses on holding news outlets accountable to the public interest and encouraging citizens to create their own media, and to be critical consumers of the mass media. Its next annual summit will be Saturday, February 26th, 2011, at Occidental College.

    The LA Progressive is a two-year-old electronic magazine that comments daily on issues of political, social, and cultural consequence to progressives in Los Angeles and everywhere.

    Alliance Hollywood is a social advocacy group that utilizes the voice, media and financial power of the entertainment industry to fight corporate interest groups on Capitol Hill.

    Questions? Contact us at lamrg@commoncause.org

     
  • Sylvia Moore 10:53 am on August 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: activism, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    Will the Public Finally Get Energized About Net Neutrality? 

    Sometimes I wonder what it was going to take to get the public more galvanized on the issue of protecting Net Neutrality. As if the Supreme Court’s enthusiastic approval of oligarchy wasn’t enough, we’re facing another one of the biggest threats to free speech and democracy – corporate control of the Web.

    Basically, the telecommunications industry wants to erect tollbooths on the Internet. They want to make content creators pay top dollar for their web sites to download faster. They want to choose winners and losers, get rid of competition and make consumers cough up more money. Gutting net neutrality is great if you’re a certain cable company, like, say, Comcast, who wants to merge with a certain entertainment company, like, say, NBC Universal, and combined, you wish to crush any troublesome Internet entertainment startup. Gutting net neutrality would also be great news for the giant television news outlets and bad news for any of the myriad of web sites that criticize them.

    Unfortunately, net neutrality was never the sexiest political issue. So maybe the announcement last week that Google and Verizon were proposing to put up the tollbooths on the wireless Internet (your smartphone) would wake people up. Google was initially the premier corporate champion of net neutrality, so the company’s about-face shocked and angered many. Apparently, since Google is now getting into the cell phone business, suddenly net neutrality was no longer good for the bottom line.

    Google and Verizon swear they want to keep the wired Internet (your PC) free and open, but the proverbial camel’s nose is sniffing under that tent. Consumer and media reform groups and some lawmakers have been the most vocal advocates for net neutrality. But greater support for net neutrality has to come from average Joes and Janes who use the Web. Too many people I fear are still apathetic on this issue. If you don’t start bugging your representatives, you may one day find that your favorite web sites are taking five minutes or more to load. Or you may find you have to pay extra for content you once got for free.

    Comedian and now U.S. Senator from Minnesota, Al Franken, has been at the forefront in fighting for net neutrality in Congress. Today, at 4PM PST (6PM Central), the Federal Communications Commission is holding a hearing in Minneapolis on the issue. The proceedings will be streamed live.

    In the video below, Franken talks on local Minnesota television about the importance of net neutrality.

    Below are some good opinion pieces about net neutrality:

    Google-Verizon Deal: The End of The Internet as We Know It

    Our view on ‘net neutrality’: Don’t erect tollbooths on information superhighway


    To show your support for net neutrality, sign Sen. Franken’s petition and send your comments to the FCC by going to Save the Internet. And also, call, write and fax your congressperson and senators. If you don’t know your representatives, you can look them up by entering your zip code on Congress.org.

     
  • Sylvia Moore 1:33 pm on August 2, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: activism, , blogging, , , , minorities, , , ,   

    Bloggers of Color Speak Out at Netroots Nation 

    For the past decade, political bloggers have become important watchdogs and critics of the mainstream media. But the blogosphere is largely white and upper-middle class. Writers who don’t fit into that mold are diligently building up a Web presence, gaining influence and slowly changing how communities of color are perceived. Five DailyKos bloggers representing the African-American, Latino and Native American communities spoke at the Netroots Nation conference on a panel called Promoting People of Color in the Progressive Blogosphere. The bloggers talked about how they got started as political “ranters,” the unique challenges they face as bloggers of color, and the rewards that come with writing about issues they are passionate about. The featured speakers, named here by their DailyKos handles, were: Black Kos, shanikka, navajo, TexMex, and Deoliver47. Watch the entire panel below:

    Vodpod videos no longer available.

     
  • Sylvia Moore 1:07 pm on July 28, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: activism, , , , , Institute of Popular Education, , , Mobile Voices, , Voces Moviles, VozMob, , ZeroDivide   

    Netroots Nation Panel on Bridging the Digital Divide 

    How can the poor, who often have limited or no access to the Internet, become content providers on the Web? What’s being done to help those who can’t afford computers get their concerns and messages across over the Internet? These issues and more were discussed last week at the Netroots Nation panel Building a National Broadband Plan: How Activists in California Are Bridging the Digital Divide. Featured speakers were Sasha Constanza-Chock, founder of VozMob (Voces Moviles, Mobile Voices); Madelou Gonzalez, a VozMob member and volunteer for the Institute of Popular Education of Southern California; Amalia Deloney, Grassroots Policy Director for the Center for Media Justice; and Ruth Williams, Community Investment Officer for ZeroDivide. LA Media Reform’s own Will Coley served as moderator. Watch the entire session below:

    Vodpod videos no longer available.

     
    • Amanda 2:55 pm on August 2, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Nice! I hope we can get some of those (all!) speakers at our upcoming summit… Access to Broadband as topic for our panel?

      As stated above, barriers to broadband include access and affordability…”One of the more hidden barriers is relevancy. For people to desire broadband generally, they must understand why it’s important to have it. This understanding is strongest when people become generators and producers of their own content. We found that content’s level of sophistication and the type of content is less important than the times people create. So the amount of time you spend creating, the amount of things that you do create, is more important to your understanding and desire for broadband. ”

      Maybe a nice tie-in with all of our media-creating workshops!

      • Sylvia 9:07 pm on August 2, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Yes, I agree, this would make a good workshop.

  • Sylvia Moore 12:42 pm on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: activism, , Color of Change, , , , , , Poker Players Alliance, political activism   

    Netroots Nation Panel on Internet Freedom 

    Everyone who uses the Web for social networking, political action and entertainment should be concerned that the major telecommunications companies wish to get their grubby hands on the reins of the Internet so they can start gouging consumers more than they already do. Having a free and open Internet is essential for grassroots political activists who use the blogosphere to express alternative points of view shut out of the mainstream media. Last weekend’s Netroots Nation conference featured a panel on net neutrality, also known as Internet Freedom. The panel, called Protecting Rights in the Digital Realm, included Amalia Deloney, Grassroots Policy Director for the Center for Media Justice; Andy Bloch of the Poker Players Alliance; and James Rucker, co-founder of ColorofChange.org.

    Vodpod videos no longer available.

     
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