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  • Will Coley 10:59 am on January 17, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Christiane Amanpour, video   

    #ICYMI Video via @mediabistro: Christiane Amanpour’s First Big Break 

    She is one of the most recognizable foreign correspondents on network television today. But did you know Christiane Amanpour’s journey to the front lines of reporting included a stint as a graphics coordinator at a local NBC station?

    In this episode of My First Big Break, Christiane Amanpour talks about how first big break, escaping the Iranian revolution with her family, started a journey that took her from WJAR in Providence, RI, all the way to the front lines of the first Gulf War as a reporter for CNN.

     
  • Will Coley 10:42 am on November 13, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: KPCC, video   

    Video via @KPCC: Great Moments in #PubRadio Romance 

    Our love affair with public radio burns bright on the big screen. Do you have a deep affection for your little radio friend? If so, you should support us. (More …)

     
  • Will Coley 3:23 pm on February 10, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: EF, video   

    Video by @EF: Living The Language Of Los Angeles 


    via @laimyours:

    What is the language of Los Angeles? Well, I mean, we all speak English, but what are the expressions and words and language that are most important to us, here, in Los Angeles? Education First seeks to answer that question in their Live The Language campaign, which features a series of videos that explore language in parts of the world… The Los Angeles video sees a foreign exchange student arriving and going to school and doing things young kinds do in our city.

     
  • Will Coley 8:41 am on February 3, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Chris Crutchfield, video   

    Video by @ChrisCrutch: Digitals (or Notification Hell) 

    via Gigaom blogpost “We are all living inside the notification hell

    by Chris Crutchfield

    One day I got an email, an sms, a phone call, a Facebook message and two tweets all within about 5 seconds of one another. This video is a re-manifestation of my brain’s interpretation of that event.

     
  • Will Coley 1:03 pm on January 23, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , video   

    Video: @Youtube – One Hour Per Second 


    Check out a new site from Google called One Hour Per Second.

     
  • Will Coley 7:45 pm on January 13, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Boyle Heights, video   

    Video via @PolitikMedia: Hometown Loving Boyle Heights Youth Head to Harvard 

    Excerpt writtne by Julianne Hing and reposted from Colorlines

    For Los Angeles teen Perla Gutierrez, a trip with her classmates to visit Harvard was not just her first time visiting the East Coast. It was her first time in an airplane. (More …)

     
  • Will Coley 2:13 pm on January 10, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: #occupyla, #ows, Takepart, video   

    Video via @TakePart: #OccupyLA – Scenes from the New Revolution 

    (More …)

     
  • Will Coley 12:11 pm on September 24, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: @infoasaid, video   

    Video by @InfoAsAid: Communication = Aid 


    In any emergency, be it natural disaster or man-made, people’s lives are turned upside down. Knowing what’s happening, where to go for assistance and who to call for help is crucial to their survival and recovery. The goal of the ‘infoasaid’ project is to help humanitarian organisations integrate two way communication into their emergency programmes. This in turn will improve the quality and coverage of humanitarian response. The ‘Communication is Aid’ animation is designed to demonstrate the positive impact of two way communication with crisis affected populations.

    For more info, go to http://www.infoasaid.org

     
  • Sylvia Moore 1:09 pm on February 4, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: AJE, , , Arab, Arabic, , BBC World News, , , cable companies, , , , , foreign, , international, , , , , , , , , video,   

    I Want My A-J-E (Al Jazeera English)! 

    If you want the best, most comprehensive coverage of the uprising in Egypt, Al Jazeera English (AJE) is the place to tune in. The images and reporting have been nothing short of riveting. But most people in the United States, including here in Los Angeles, have no access to the channel on their cable systems. Instead, if you have Internet access, you can view AJE online through its live video stream. Thank goodness for that. As a result, the news channel has seen a 2,500% increase in traffic to its web site this week — 60% of that from the U.S., according to Tony Burman, Al Jazeera’s chief strategic adviser for the Americas. Clearly, many Americans want more in depth information about Eygpt’s revolution than the shallow and sensationalistic U.S. media provide.

    Launched in 2006, AJE is the English language counterpart to Al Jazeera, the Doha, Qatar-based, Arabic-language news channel immensely popular around the Arab world. Unfortunately, Al Jazeera has had a bad reputation in the U.S., where it’s known mainly as the channel where Osama bin Laden liked to showcase his greatest hits. During the Bush years, administration officials and conservatives accused Al Jazeera of being anti-American. And Israel supporters aren’t big fans of the channel, which typically gives a lot more attention to the suffering of the Palestinians. Outside the U.S., Al Jazeera gets a better reception, and is known as a hard-hitting independent network that’s not afraid to cast an unflattering light on autocratic dictators. For example, in Egypt, the regime has kicked the network out of the country, arrested its journalists, and banned it from the airwaves there.

    AJE is seen in more than 100 countries, including Canada and yes, Israel. But AJE is only available on cable stations in Washington D.C., Toledo, Ohio, and Burlington,Vermont, of all places. I have Time Warner digital, and I saw that one of the KCET digital channels – KCETM 239 – is supposed to carry a half-hour of AJE on weeknights. But when I actually checked last night, strangely, an Asian soap opera was running in the time slot. Anyway, I’ll go back to watching as much of AJE as I want on my computer desktop. But it would still be nice to be able to watch it on the TV while lying on my couch in the den or eating a snack in the kitchen.

    So why the near blackout in the U.S.? Huffington Post’s Ryan Grim writes that there are political and commercial reasons, and he points to an illuminating essay from a former AJE  associate producer, Paige Austin. Below is a video from Democracy Now! this week about the media blackout of AJE in the U.S. and of Al Jazeera in Egypt:

    I’ve watched AJE occasionally for about two years. Being the news junkie that I am, and dissatisfied with the quality and dearth of international news in the American media, I was excited when I first learned of AJE’s existence. Initially, you could only get selected videos on YouTube. Later, AJE’s streaming video became available through a site called LiveStation, which has several international news channels, including BBC World Service (audio only), Deutsche Welle (audio only), RFI, Russia Today and France 24. I only discovered this week that AJE now streams directly from its web site. All of these streams are free.

    Seeing how the news is reported outside of the American (or even Western) prism is refreshing and revealing. Instead of an over-reliance on a couple of pundits carping at each other in a two-sided debate, you’re likely to see more academics, representatives from non-governmental organizations, human rights activists and regular people from the street give their views on issues of the day. While watching the coverage of the Egyptian protests, I heard analysis from several Middle Eastern experts, a human rights activist who was jailed by the regime, a blogger, several protesters and a U.S. congressman I’d never seen on American TV before.

    Al Jazeera executives are actively trying to get American cable companies to offer AJE, and they are using the Internet stats to bolster their case. It’s probably still going to be an uphill battle, just because of all the ignorance and prejudice against anything that isn’t American, especially if it comes from the Arab world. BBC World News, the BBC’s international channel, also isn’t widely available in the U.S. Its only Los Angeles presence is a few half-hour segments on local public television and a four-hour block on the cable channel, BBC America.

    BBC America, a channel specifically created for the U.S. market, shows re-runs of popular U.K. programs (Los Angeles stations: Time Warner Cable Channel 131, AT&T U-verse Channel 188, DIRECT TV Channel 264, and DISH Network Channels 135 and 879). It only has three hours of BBC World News, which unfortunately, airs very early in the morning. On weeknights, however, the channel airs a one-hour news show tailored to the American audience called BBC World News America. This program broadcasts from Washington D.C. and reports on domestic American news, often times from an angle you rarely see on American television. For example, I found the channel’s coverage on the financial crisis from the point of view of ordinary Americans particularly good. BBC World News America is also a good supplement to the lack of comprehensive international news on American media. If you don’t have cable, you can watch BBC World News America videos on its web site.

    If I have one beef about BBC World News America, it’s that the show’s anchors interview some of the same American media pundits and Beltway lawmakers who have no fresh ideas, and whom I wanted to get away from in the first place. Also, I wish the anchors would get a lot tougher with their questioning, especially when Congressperson So-and-So is playing fast and loose with the truth. I find that AJE anchors tend to be a bit more challenging, especially with American government officials and lawmakers.

    A few years ago, I signed a petition BBC World News circulated to get its channel into more American homes – including Los Angeles – but it looks like that effort went nowhere. So regrettably, most Americans are stuck with the provincial and mind-numbing American news media, that do their best to shield the public from much of what’s really going on in the rest of the world, and from the uncomfortable truths about their own country. I find it quite interesting that it’s just fine for the Beltway politicians to watch AJE on their TV sets, but most of their constituents can’t be exposed to such alternative views. Contrary to conventional wisdom, I believe most Americans do care about international news and want a diversity of viewpoints if given the opportunity. What are they really afraid of if AJE, or even BBC or another foreign news service were widely available in the U.S.? That Americans just might form opinions contrary to what the ruling Washington and corporate elites want them to think? The best the public can do at this point is to keep putting the pressure on their cable companies. One can hope that AJE’s new-found publicity and popularity among Americans will cause the cable companies to cave.

     
  • Sylvia Moore 12:47 pm on January 19, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , public airwaves, , , Sue Wilson, , video   

    Broadcast Blues’ Sue Wilson Talks About Hate Speech 

    How did so much of American radio and television turn from a marketplace of diverse political ideas into a cesspool of Wall Street propaganda and violent-tinged ranting? In the aftermath of the deadly shootings in Tucson, Arizona, filmmaker Sue Wilson appeared Jan. 12 on Nicole Sandler’s Radio or Not show to talk about how media consolidation destroyed the ability of communities to control local programming and led to the rise of hate speech on the public airwaves. Sue also talks about her plans to start an organized effort to legally challenge the radio licenses of broadcasters who abuse the public trust. Sue’s excellent film, Broadcast Blues, outlines the history and consequences of the deregulation of radio and television. The interview starts at 1:16:55. Click here to listen.

     
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